Category Archives: ART MUSEUM

Acrylic on canvas by Caio Fern 2000


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Painting = Silent Weapon – Winsor & Newton – Vintage Advertising Campaingns – ART AS SUBSTITUTE OF GOD !!!!!


   

Painting = Silent Weapon – Winsor & Newton – Vintage Advertising Campaingns – ART AS SUBSTITUTE OF GOD !!!!!

http://www.winsornewton.com/news/new-products/vintage-advertising-campaigns?lang=gb&utm_campaign=1107369105&utm_content=1032235084235&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Emailvision

I found this article about vintage Winsor&Newton’s Campaign.
It is so appropriated, I really liked. I have used Winsor & Newton paint since 1999 and since 2000 exclusively this brand as I really care about posterity of the works and quality when painting. It made me glad to find this poster.
It is from the Second War ….. what makes sense…..
But makes me ask for how many generations have we been taught to believe that art can be used as weapon……
Isn’t this too common sense ? And for how long, centuries or decades have we believed that art can make real difference? Wasn’t like that at the beginning of the civilization and Art History.
Who has/had the interest to teach this and keep it alive? Why?
And why people believe that it is true? I learned this when was at the Kinder Garden already? Was I victim of brain wash? With what interest it was done to me? When it started?
And if it is all wrong? Why did the society started to substitute the idea that God, Moral and spirituality wasn’t the solution for Freedom or the Truth anymore but art and the men’s invention was ?
People that puts its faith on art isn’t different that people that puts its faith on science or money.

For how many years will I fight to clean the masonry and illuminati’s influence on the society for the last 4 centuries from my life, body, mind and soul ? I WANT TO GET RID OF THIS WORLD.

www.silentspots.blogspot.com
www.meinwelt-22.blogspot.com
www.caiowelt.blogspot.com

Caio Fern said…
paint this up… Linda !!!!

March 23, 2011 9:50 AM
Anne Huskey-Lockard said…
Hey Caio,

I’ve always felt people who are afraid of art are people who have a lie to tell and think an artist might portray the truth.
I am not saying art hasn’t been used as propaganda, but currently we are facing massive cut to the National Endowments for the Arts and Public Broadcasting, and certain political wanna-bes and pundits are *demonizing* the arts as a whole, and anything art related.
Well, maybe it’s because we don’t bow to their political, divisive whims. Maybe we have a little more intelligence~~maybe want an opposing viewpoint to be able to conscientiously consider before forming an opinion.
I have no answers other than the times I am living in are unkind to artists wanting to portray the truth of what is going on. Never thought I would see the day either…

XXOO~~♥
Anne

March 23, 2011 10:05 AM
Caio Fern said…
Hello Anne !!!
i was only asking why we were taught to worthship art in general.

i think it is a little bit deeper than politics.
It is about spirituality.

March 23, 2011 10:12 AM
Caio Fern said…
other thing…. is another , totaly diferent subject to me … but here in Brazil government uses art for alienating the poor population.

March 23, 2011 10:14 AM
Anne Huskey-Lockard said…
Hmmm….that is sad and interesting that they do that with art. The business of art being only for the wealthy.
I don’t know why it is not an accessible item to everyone. There have been too many strings attached to the whole thing.
People need to just make art. And I agree–I think there is a particular spirituality to it, at least when I work. (an aside, my minister is having me speak to a confirmation class about Spirituality in Work….ought to be interesting…)
I wish there were no politics involved in it at all.
That’s a dream! 😉

XXOO~~♥
Anne

March 23, 2011 10:20 AM
Caio Fern said…
that is a dream…
but for the last thousands of years art and politic = power… were always closed related. 99,9% of the masterpieces wouldn’t exist if the royal familys and richer familys weren’t behind suporting it production.

So we must to learn to deal with it and be ble to put our particular view of world, human being and feeling despite all the money and power involved.

even so all this only started, again, not for political issues… i was only asking why and how all the modern civilization substituted it real spiritual values for aesthetical values .

March 23, 2011 10:26 AM
Caio Fern said…
The aim of every artist is to arrest motion, which is life, by artificial means and hold it fixed so that a hundred years later, when a stranger looks at it, it moves again since it is life.”
William Faulkner

March 23, 2011 11:24 AM
Caio Fern said…
This post has been removed by the author.
March 23, 2011 11:52 AM
Caio Fern said…
Christine Tarantino – NewNew Art –
This morning I was thinking about similar things. How as soon as I make a mark, that mark is dead. It no longer flows, it stops. I wonder if this is something artists might think about, ethically. Do you want the marks you make to really be there? And should all marks of art be beautiful? I say yes, to try is to aspire.

Caio Fern – Christine…if i don’t leave my work to posterity i feel no will to work….. my only need to to reach peoples the way artists of other centuries reached me.
it is more than reaching people from other cultures… i want to reach people from other times too…… this is eternity in art … this is a way of human being reachs some “material” ” phisical” and emotional eternity. about spiritual issues…..i don’t need art at all.
spiritual developing can be reached by itself .

but my work talks only about spirituall issues 😀

The Museu de Arte de São Paulo (MASP) ~ The Finest Art Collection In South America


http://www.artknowledgenews.com/2011_03_14_23_27_15_the_museu_de_arte_de_sao_paulo_masp_the_finest_art_collection_in_south_america.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+artknowledge+%28Art+Knowledge+News+-+Keeping+You+in+Touch+with+the+World+of+Art…%29

 

The Museu de Arte de São Paulo (MASP) ~ The Finest Art Collection In South America

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artwork: The Museu de Arte de São Paulo (MASP). Widely considered to be the finest art museum in the Southern Hemisphere. MASP has occupied the iconic concrete and glass structure designed by Italian architect Lina Bo Bardi since 1969.

The São Paulo Museum of Art (MASP) is located on Paulista Avenue in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. It’s well-known for its current home in a 1968 concrete and glass structure designed by Lina Bo Bardi, the main body of the building is supported by two lateral beams over a 74 meter freestanding space. The building is considered a landmark and a symbol of modern Brazilian architecture. MASP is internationally recognized for its collection of Western art, considered the finest in Latin America and indeed, the entire Southern Hemisphere. It also houses an impressive collection of Brazilian art, prints and drawings, as well as smaller collections of African and Asian art, antiquities, decorative arts, and others, amounting to almost 15,000 pieces. MASP also has one of the largest art libraries of the country. The museum’s history started in the 1940s. Assis Chateaubriand, founder and owner of Diários Associados (“Associated Dailies”), the largest media and press conglomerate of Brazil at the time, launched a campaign, with the bold intent of acquiring masterpieces to form an art collection of international standard in Brazil. Originally, he intended to locate the museum in Rio de Janeiro, but chose São Paulo where he believed it would be easier to gather the necessary funds, since the city was booming. At the same time, the European art market had been deeply influenced by World War II, making it possible to acquire fine artworks for reasonable prices. Chateaubriand recruited Pietro Maria Bardi, an Italian professor, critic and art dealer, to help him create a “Museum of Classical and Modern Art”. The museum was inaugurated and opened to the public on October 2, 1947, displaying the first acquisitions, including canvases by Picasso and Rembrandt on the first floor of the Associated Dailies headquarters. In the 1950s the museum expanded, creating the Institute of Contemporary Art (offering workshops of engraving, drawing, painting, sculpture, dance and industrial design), the Publicity School (presently the ‘Superior School of Propaganda and Marketing’), organizing debates about cinema and literature and creating a youth orchestra and a ballet company. Alongside the educational program, the museum expanded its collections and began to organize travelling exhibitions from the collection. Between 1953 and 1957, a selection of 100 masterpieces of the museum’s collection traveled throughout European museums, such as Musée de l’Orangerie (Paris) and the Tate Gallery (London). In 1957, the collection was displayed in the United States, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and in the Toledo Museum of Art. The following year, the museum’s holdings were presented in other Brazilian institutions, such as the Museu Nacional de Belas Artes, in Rio de Janeiro. These exhibitions served to gain publicity for the fledgling museum, increasing attendance and providing funds for further expansion of the collection. It soon became clear that the museum needed its own, much larger site, and in the 1950s plans were drawn up to move into a purpose-built gallery on a site donated by the city council and Italian-born architect Lina Bo Bardi (wife of Pietro Maria Bardi) was commissioned to design the new building. The construction is considered to be unique worldwide for its peculiarity: the main body of the building stands on four lateral supporting pillars, creating a void underneath the building. Built between 1956 and 1968, the new museum was inaugurated by Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom. The museum building has 13,000 sq. meters of floor space spread on five levels, including the permanent and temporary exhibition rooms, library, photo gallery, film gallery, video gallery, two auditoriums, restaurant, a store, workshop rooms, administrative offices and restoration facilities. More than 60,000 visitors a month make the MASP the most visited museum in São Paulo. Visit MASP’s website at …
The São Paulo Museum of Art (MASP) is located on Paulista Avenue in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. It’s well-known for its current home in a 1968 concrete and glass structure designed by Lina Bo Bardi, the main body of the building is supported by two lateral beams over a 74 meter freestanding space. The building is considered a landmark and a symbol of modern Brazilian architecture. MASP is internationally recognized for its collection of Western art, considered the finest in Latin America and indeed, the entire Southern Hemisphere. It also houses an impressive collection of Brazilian art, prints and drawings, as well as smaller collections of African and Asian art, antiquities, decorative arts, and others, amounting to almost 15,000 pieces. MASP also has one of the largest art libraries of the country. The museum’s history started in the 1940s. Assis Chateaubriand, founder and owner of Diários Associados (“Associated Dailies”), the largest media and press conglomerate of Brazil at the time, launched a campaign, with the bold intent of acquiring masterpieces to form an art collection of international standard in Brazil. Originally, he intended to locate the museum in Rio de Janeiro, but chose São Paulo where he believed it would be easier to gather the necessary funds, since the city was booming. At the same time, the European art market had been deeply influenced by World War II, making it possible to acquire fine artworks for reasonable prices. Chateaubriand recruited Pietro Maria Bardi, an Italian professor, critic and art dealer, to help him create a “Museum of Classical and Modern Art”. The museum was inaugurated and opened to the public on October 2, 1947, displaying the first acquisitions, including canvases by Picasso and Rembrandt on the first floor of the Associated Dailies headquarters. In the 1950s the museum expanded, creating the Institute of Contemporary Art (offering workshops of engraving, drawing, painting, sculpture, dance and industrial design), the Publicity School (presently the ‘Superior School of Propaganda and Marketing’), organizing debates about cinema and literature and creating a youth orchestra and a ballet company. Alongside the educational program, the museum expanded its collections and began to organize travelling exhibitions from the collection. Between 1953 and 1957, a selection of 100 masterpieces of the museum’s collection traveled throughout European museums, such as Musée de l’Orangerie (Paris) and the Tate Gallery (London). In 1957, the collection was displayed in the United States, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and in the Toledo Museum of Art. The following year, the museum’s holdings were presented in other Brazilian institutions, such as the Museu Nacional de Belas Artes, in Rio de Janeiro. These exhibitions served to gain publicity for the fledgling museum, increasing attendance and providing funds for further expansion of the collection. It soon became clear that the museum needed its own, much larger site, and in the 1950s plans were drawn up to move into a purpose-built gallery on a site donated by the city council and Italian-born architect Lina Bo Bardi (wife of Pietro Maria Bardi) was commissioned to design the new building. The construction is considered to be unique worldwide for its peculiarity: the main body of the building stands on four lateral supporting pillars, creating a void underneath the building. Built between 1956 and 1968, the new museum was inaugurated by Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom. The museum building has 13,000 sq. meters of floor space spread on five levels, including the permanent and temporary exhibition rooms, library, photo gallery, film gallery, video gallery, two auditoriums, restaurant, a store, workshop rooms, administrative offices and restoration facilities. More than 60,000 visitors a month make the MASP the most visited museum in São Paulo. Visit MASP’s website at … http://masp.art.br

The collection contains almost 10,000 pieces, mostly of Western art from the fourth century BC to today. The collections of French and Italian artworks are particularly strong. Italian artists are represented by Raphael, Botticelli, Mantegna, Giovanni Bellini, Titian, Tintoretto, Perugino, Piero di Cosimo, Guido Reni and Guercino. Notable French works include paintings by François Clouet, Poussin, Jean-Marc Nattier, Delacroix, Courbet, Manet, Monet, Renoir, Degas, Cézanne, Van Gogh and Toulouse-Lautrec. MASP also has the complete collection of 73 sculptures by Edgar Degas as well as three of the artist’s paintings. Spanish Art is represented by El Greco, Francisco Goya and Diego Velazquez with British Artists include works from Thomas Gainsborough, Joshua Reynolds, John Constable, George Romney and J. M. W. Turner, among others (including a Winston Churchill oil painting “The Blue Room, Trent Park”). Among the works by Flemish, Dutch and German artists which are on show are paintings by Hieronymus Bosch, Memling, Cranach, Quentin Matsys, Peter Paul Rubens, Rembrandt, Frans Hals, Anthony van Dyck and Jan van Dornicke. American artworks in the collection include pieces by Torres Garcia, Diego Rivera, Siqueiros, Alexander Calder and among many Brazilian artists, including Frans Post, Victor Meirelles de Lima, Nicolas Antoine Taunay, Tarsila do Amaral, Nicola Antonio Facchinetti, Candido Portinari, Di Cavalcanti, Anita Malfatti, Lasar Segall, Almeida Junior, Victor Brecheret and Flavio de Carvalho. Modern and contemporary works include paintings and drawings by Pablo Picasso, Fernand Leger, Modigliani, Matisse, Marc Chagall, Max Ernst, Salvador Dalí, Joan Miró, Andy Warhol and Jim Dine. MASP also have small but significant collections of African and Asian arts. The core collection also includes archaeological artifacts (Egyptian, Etruscan, Greek, Roman and pre-Colombian American), sculptures (including Rodin bronzes, pieces by Ernesto di Fiori and Victor Brecheret among others), drawings, prints, photographs, majolica (Italian pottery), as well as tapestries, clothing and design.

MASP have a large program of temporary exhibitions, featuring both works from their own collection and loan items. Amongst the former, a special exhibition of sculpture from the collection under the title “Fashionable Obsessions: Sculpture from the MASP Collection” (until March 27th 2011) features 50 works by masters of three-dimensional art from the 19th century to the present day (and a pair of Tang-dynasty Chinese terracotta warriors). Among works by Renoir, Degas, Brecheret, Felicia Leirner, Alexander Calder, Bruno Giorgi, Rodin, Arcangelo Ianelli, Duke Lee, Jim Dine and others, particular highlights include “Greta Garbo” by Ernesto de Fiori, “Venus” by Pierre Renoir, “14 year old dancer” by Edgar Degas, “Birds” by Wesley Duke Lee and “Winged Bicho” by Emanuel Araújo. Until May 1st 2011, “Brzilian Papers: The Art of Printmaking” features a selection of over 120 works by masters of the different techniques of engraving. “The Art of Printmaking” collects works by Volpi, Tarsila, Babinski, Samico, Manny Araujo, Gruber, Garden, Segall, Grassmann, Valentine, Hudinilson, Leirner and many others from the MASP collection. These works illustrate the history of printmaking in Brazil. An ongoing exhibitions “Gods and Madonas – The Art of the Sacred” features 40 works from the 14th to 19th centuries, including Andrea Mantegna’s “St. Jerome in the Wilderness”, on display for the first time since undergoing restoraration. Besides the museum, MASP is a cultural center that provides various activities to the public as an art school, workshops, dance performances, music and theater, lectures and debates, courses for teachers, among many other activities held throughout the year.

Among the sculptures stand out the marbles of the Greek goddess Higéia the fourth century BC and the collection of 73 sculptures by Degas, which can only be seen fully in the MASP, the Metropolitan Museum in New York or the Museum D’Orsay in Paris . Collections of prints, photographs, drawings, archeology, majolica, tapestries and European decorative arts, plus a large collection of kitsch pieces, are also part of the museum. The museum has broadened its collection through donations from individuals and partnerships with companies and institutions. Since 1990, it is considered essential to the exchange and partnership between museums in the world, is to upgrade skills or to restore our works. Responsibilities of the Department of Conservation and Restoration. The Department of Conservation and Restoration of MASP conservation, preservation and restoration of works belonging to the museum, as well as assist in the conservation area for temporary exhibitions from other museums or institutions. Whereas the museum’s works are stored, displayed and transported in accordance with international museums, the department of conservation and restoration develops an important role in preventive conservation, treatment and safety of the collection. The mission of MASP is to “encourage, promote and sustain, by all means at its disposal, the arts in general and in particular the visual arts, promoting the development and cultural improvement

http://masp.art.br

Subversion


Subversion in art , don’t worry , it is happening .
We don’t have a such strong feeling of this because today has too many things happening at the same time and most part are mediocre.
Other thing is when we think about subversive art History facts and names come to our mind in a very 
condensed way giving the impression that in the past lots of innovative things were happening all the time . We always talk about past as it was very intense . And it was , but for short moments , most part of the time events didn’t happen so fast one after the other.
Don’t worry , 
innovations and subversion are happening.
But What I want to know is…… what do people “wants” to call and consider subversion and why they believe that need this so much?
Isn’t any idea of subversion too well 
established and acceptable for the mainstream culture ? Too 20th century ?
I mean, the 
dumbest people I know are pro to any concept that presents itself as a subversive act. Why ?
It happens even more in the art world. What is very contradictory. Art world always present itself as searching for 
innovations , vanguards, subversion….. but is the most conservative “world” of all…. everything that happens on the visual art world happened decades before on music, cinema , then literature….. and thennnn….. ta da !!! Arrives at the art world landing as a really innovative ideas.
It doesn’t represent the 
History at all but at least the last decades.
So what people really want with this glamorous idea of subversion ? Pose ? An excuse for all the mainstream life they have had ?

www.silentspots.blogspot.com
www.meinwelt-22.blogspot.com
www.caiowelt.blogspot.com

SLAM FAD #140- Caio Fern: From Mein Welt, With Love


SLAM FAD #140- Caio Fern: From Mein Welt, With Love

SLAM FAD #140- Caio Fern: From Mein Welt, With Love

by Terri  Lloyd

© Caio Fern

SLAM: Caio, you were born in Brazil and you studied psychology at Universidade Paulista. When did you become an artist? And how does your education influence your work?
C – As a matter of fact I was already producing visual art before to decide about college and what to study. When I started to work with the intention of producing something for real ( 1995 ) I was 20 years old and experimented many medias including computers and technology related materials. Psychology was a choice I took because believed that it would give me a better way to go deeper into the art work . I never had the intention of being a professional psychologist, only worked with this for few years and dropped. So my art has influence on my scientific way to deal with myself . Studying it helped me to see human being in a less romantic way and with less ideologies too. I can say the science gave me a good level of freedom to explore myself with no conceptual excuses.
 
 

© Caio Fern

SLAM: It’s been stated that you are sometimes described as a realist with a highly individualistic style. How you do see yourself and your work? Do you find this assessment accurate or is this just another label to perhaps help us cope with the deeper intensity and exploration of your works?
C I don’t mind when people talks about realism when see my work . I think it is funny . I am laughing now. It isn’t wrong at all. All my paintings are result of observation . Light can give all that is necessary for self expression . I really try to do not be creative . I believe that creativity is a weakness, a resource you use when aren’t able to deal with things the way they are . It happens with me, sometimes I have to go beyond of what is considered reality . But it is still real . There is no lie or fiction. Is only reality by other angle . My way to see and deal with reality is extremely subjective and lonely. When I look to my works… they are hipper-realistic to me. But I get surprised when see people calling that realism or “a kind of realism” . I really didn’t expect that people would be able to see this way . Most part doesn’t .
 
 

© Caio Fern

SLAM: You have stated that “the intention of your work is to be impressive exactly by the fact that it has nothing impressive about this.” Is this minimalist or do you find this to be perhaps more aligned with a zen, if you will, type of intent?
C – I don’t like to see me as a minimalist , even less with the 20Th century’s concept of it . Because this idea would never allow me to go further and deeper into my work if was adopted, it would never fulfill my needs . About art today, it is the opposite, it is trying to impress too much .It seems that it is made for teenagers, maybe because is a very immature society . It is extremely Rococo and at the end all you have is thousands of exhibition with very impressive works that doesn’t feed, making you go back home with that feeling of “whatever”. It is all shallow . Even more with Tumblr , Flickr, blogs, so many art-fairs , biennials….. where you have to capture the viewer as fast as possible making it easy to digest . Art has became something very similar, if not identical , advertisement . I only want to develop a work with no frames or ornaments inside it . Simple and direct … but that allows the viewer to have a long relationship with it for many years . If sometimes my painting causes impact, I want to make it sure that has much more than this, that you can look to this for your entire life and will always discover and rediscover the work. Sounds contradictory , I know, being direct , simple and at the same time having so many layers of perception to be experimented for years .
 
 

© Caio Fern

SLAM:”Reductive” is also a word you’ve used in relation to your work. So is “a lack of spice.” How so?
C – Yes , Reductive is what I believe the best way to describe my work . It has the intention to reduces the feelings and attention of the viewer towards a target . There is nothing else, only focuses on that and go deep . Any distraction is going to be allowed . That is the reason I choose this word as the name of one of my books . Lack of spices is pretty much about this too . It is interesting you put the both expressions here together .
 
 

© Caio Fern

SLAM: This is a fabulously audacious thing to say, ” …only mediocre people produce with no pretentious [pretense]. Art is about pretentious [pretense], is about to go beyond. Even my smaller drawings has the pretentious [pretense] of an entire empire.”
Do you think artists today are losing the pretense or vision of their individual empire’s? And why do you think this is?
C – This is a thing that annoys me a lot about my culture . Everything here is too Bossanova , everybody wants a easy life with small inoffensive pleasures and any real commitment , any real target . Sometimes in Brazil the word ambition is seem as a sin . It has only created mediocre artists happy for spending the entire life doing plin plin on the piano or acoustic guitar singing about coconut water and teenager ass . With visual art isn’t different, everyone here only wants to follow some world’s trend because it is easier , pretty , correct , acceptable . When I get into my studio , I don’t accept anything nice or acceptable . I want to go beyond everything I have ever done and breed my own universe doesn’t matter the cost of it . On the entire world I see artists of all the generations and styles with that mentality of ” I want to do something cool” . Fuck the cool . I want something real ! If an artist hasn’t a very personal way to see him/herself and the world… so get out of my way, the world doesn’t need more people putting in practice the same values over and over again . We already have bad corporations and horrible governments doing that for us .
 
 

© Caio Fern

SLAM: What is particularly refreshing is to hear, read, you say how much you love your work. Often this is not a widely acceptable acknowledgement of what an artist does. Do you think it takes courage to be yourself, love yourself, love what you do? Or is this a necessary component to further exploration –of self, art and process?
C -I prefer to make clear that I need this as I need air . During the last decade I tried to give up of producing art and even hated art in general. But life forced me to keep doing it . At the hardest times only art was there by my side. It is very corny to say , hahah!! But is totally true . At the end the few real satisfaction I had in my life wasn’t traveling around the world or fucking a perfect pussy, helping poor people, planting trees and defending animal rights, eating a 4 cheese pizza, having friends …… but was finishing a good painting . How do I know if it is a good painting ? I only feel . It is very personal and I can’t say it applies to another artists , but all I need in my life only art can offer . I don’t know how sad or good it is … but that is the way it works with me .

© Caio Fern

SLAM: Something one notices when spending time with your works, is the influence of Punk Rock, Ramones, Misfits, Pettibon, in your work. Would you speak to SLAM readers about this?
C – One thing I really like is that when people talk with other artists about their influences they always talk about visual art , but when they talk with me about my influences names as Ramones and Misfits appears . Isn’t that great ?! hahah!!! I am serious , it really makes my day. The idea of Reductive came exactly because of punk rock : direct, intense and sincere . No guitar solos or frames , no bullshit . Cut off the crap . No conceptual excuses , no text behind . Do what must to be done and fuck off. About Raymond Petybon… I spent many years in my bed listening the albums and looking to the covers . His work was there in a way that was extremely good and reachable. I remember that my friends and I used to say : “He doesn’t look like an artist, he is real ” . Yes , I agree his work is very illustrative and sometimes even descriptive, but his ability to make the image “happens” used to fascinate me . Misfits , I think it is brilliant about everything, but Ramones is where you can find the real geniality . I like to tease people saying that Ramones is the only real form of art created on the 20Th century . I am only teasing and I know it really annoys everyone . But has some truth about this . If the Reductive idea found a form on the last century was with then . Everything that matters is there extremely concentrated. I still listen then in my studio, they are great teachers always helping me to do not lose the track .

© Caio Fern

SLAM: One would think that the influence of Punk might contribute to your statement regarding the importance of cheap supplies in the studio, “for you do not feel remorse to only sketch or try different things.” It is encouraging the artist to keep working and yet it also is a wonderful way of saying “ha ha fuck you, I’ve got pretense and cheap supplies!” Is this part of your underlying humor?
C – It made me remember now when I was starting to paint . I was very arrogant, almost as much as I am now .hahah!! I used to go to the galleries to see the exhibitions and I always got a smile on my face saying : “hahah!! my work is ten times better than this and cost 100 times less to be produced !!” The experience showed me in a fast way how important is to use really good material supplies for painting . Not only concerning about the way it looks and the possibilities for going deeper into that , but about the effects of time on it . I want to have a very well preserved work in the future . The idea of having cheaper supplies in the studio comes much more from the fact that I have no money to buy the best paints and canvasses all the time and it can make you stop before to do something you’re not sure about the results . So having cheaper stuff will help you do not have to think twice before to do anything. Do it and shut up , stop to complain about the money .

© Caio Fern

SLAM: Would you talk to us about Mein Welt? What is it? Where is it? How did this evolve?
C – Mein Welt . Long story in a very short way . In 2002 I isolated myself from the world in a dark old dusty haunting house for cleaning myself from my own life . I even left the art market , my last solo exhibition was in 2002 and after that year I wasn’t working with any gallery anymore . I started to paint again only in 2004 or something , and very few works . The Mein Welt idea was because I started to create an new universe to live with all the new values I was developing ( moral , ethical, aesthetically ). Exists my old humor inside this but I was really serious . Or I killed the world inside me and the life I had had or I would kill myself . I wouldn’t accept middle term . Mein Welt came when I was empty of all , it fulfilled my life . Was a search for a new life with beauty and peace . Something very rare when you are born and raised in Sao Paulo doesn’t matter you social class or origins . This was a period from 2004/5 to 2009. I realised in 2010 that I could keep my life going beyond of what was called Mein Welt , but it is the essence of what I live today , all my actual personal values for the everyday life were built on this period. Today this is my nationality . I consider myself a Welter , and intend even to take my own passport as a Welter very soon. When people asks me where I am from my answer is : “- From Mein Welt , sure , don’t you recognise by the typical accent ?”. Trust me , it isn’t a joke to me .

© Caio Fern

SLAM: You’ve written about how the Internet is changing the way we see art, how it influences art production, and that it also access to the learning about art. However, you’ve also stated to view art in person, is totally different relationship. (We agree!) That there is a physical power and presence when one is in front of art. But in front of a computer screen art is weak, boring.
Do you see this changing, and if so, how? Is this something that will get better over time, or something else all together?
C – Yes , it has changed . It has changed the way to see art , to discover new artists , to negotiate art , to study , to learn , to relate with art institutions and galleries, what is very good for somethings….. . About aesthetic values I won’t judge if it is going to be good or bad , but I am very optimist about it too. New medias and new ways to deal with the old ones are always welcome . I have met and talked with artists today that have produced only thinking about how it is going to look after posted on their blogs or pages . It isn’t bad at all. Not that I have any interest to produce thinking about how people will see it by their computers or whatever is the media they are going to use . I still paint for the person that is in front of the work . My only fear is that it starts to create more mainstream trends increasing gaps between artists with different productions in the market. What is very easy to happen and when I read blogs of art critics in general I start to feel this approach. It is interesting for art institutions , galleries , curators and critics to have as much people as possible thinking, doing and consuming the same . So Internet that so far has being a vehicle for alternative aesthetic values have a chance to exhibit itself and show that exists, what was almost impossible before, can be used to convince a larger number of people “what is good and what isn’t” or ” what must to be followed and what mustn’t” . I hope that collectors, new artists, and audience in general don’t be so stupid to fall into that .

© Caio Fern

SLAM – In this regard, you’ve stated, “I am here, producing what I want and sending a big FUCK YOU to the system. This is the sensation of the governments and corporations don’t want you to have…. this is the real freedom.” Are you an anarchist? Do you feel that art is perhaps a subversion from the norm, and act of anarchy?
C – Last week I send an email to a dear friend of mine saying how much I hate to be an outsider . I am an outsider because a guy that burns bridges, has a big mouth and more than everything : develops a work that is totally not related with any aesthetic or conceptual trend of the contemporary market … will not be invited to exhibit its work at the Tate Modern so soon. I don’t give a big FUCK YOU because is an ideal , but because this is what I do , simple like that . And nobody gave me the chance do NOT behave that way . I wish I was a very formal and conventional person shaking hands and having the work recognised as it should be . But is hasn’t happened so far . hahah!!! I don’t want to be part or apart of any “system” , I only believe that my work and I should be treated with more respect . But I have no doubt that art is the only human activity with power to subvert and norm . One of the facts that made me go to the college to study Psychology and not art , is because I didn’t want my name related with any academic art institution . DIY is something I take very seriously.

© Caio Fern

SLAM – Caio, you have also produced a couple of books. You wrote one, “Alemão.” It is described as a love story between two characters that grew up together and decided to give up of understanding or belonging to the world creating their own values and life style… the novel exposes contemporary values by the point of view of who lives at the other side of the concept of globalization and new world.
That’s a powerful statement. Would this reflect some of the intensity found in your art?
C – I don’t see difference between what I write and what I paint. One doesn’t complete the other and they could exist alone . I am the same person on both , I can’t change that . The book Alemão is very realistic, all you read there happened at the time the story is told ( between 1990 and 2009 ) . It isn’t a self-biographical work but there is no fiction there . The book tries to put down myths about racism , globalization, tolerance, bureaucracy in a ‘United World” and show how it all can sound as bullshit when you are at the “wrong side” not just of the world but of the life ” . The main characters are victims of other people’s values and it totally screwed their lives and minds . But isn’t a negative book . As it is described : “A love story “…. yes , an extremely not conventional love story . But beautiful . I believe that this book is edgy about everything , including aesthetically . The prove of this is that everybody starts to read the book and send me emails saying that have started . I have never received one single email of a person that have finished it .hahah!! I know that many ones got revolted and very angry . So , please , never buy my book , I don’t need more people hating me . hahahah!!

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my teacher. Evandro Carlos Jardim. one of the greatest figures for the Sao Paulo’s art scene


Today I only want to post about my teacher Evandro Carlos Jardim, a very dear man , one of the most important figures for the Sao Paulo’s art scene that I had the privilege to talk with , watch his classes and even have had the honor of him writing about my work for one of my solo exhibitions . Not only that , because of him I exhibited at Sesc Pompeia too , one of the most important art institutions here in Sao Paulo and had my work published on a collective book in 2001.
But I remember his classes …. I used to say that he was too generous when talking about other people’s work . hahahah!! But he was the responsible to make me realise how important is to be generous and offer everything you have when you are producing. This is impossible to forget. I never met anyone from any part of the world that understands more about art and art History than him , not everyone so passionate about it .
On the first photo of this post you see him working at his studio , “atelier” as we say here.
He was my neighbor in Alto da Boa Vista ( Gartenstadt for who read my book Alemão ) , it was South Area , but we only used to meet at West Area where are the art galleries , institutions and universities.
He was maybe the biggest enthusiast of my work supporting me about everything and gave me many advises… the biggest one was to go to USP , the most important Art College in Brazil and South America where he is a teacher … I didn’t accept , he got very sad and said that my carrier would never happen if I denied this invitation because the Sao Paulo’s art market is very …. well…. a real elitist shit, using my own words. After this I came to Mooca and got into Mein Welt phase … I totally lost contact with him . In 2005 or 6 had a big retrospective of his carrier at the Pinacoteca do Estado de Sao Paulo , a very important institution , but I wasn’t in Brazil for visiting it or going to the opening night.
I still didn’t see him yet and I don’t know if will because I am very lazy for social relations even when I like the person.

Obrigado Evandro . Todo meu carinho para voce .