Category Archives: art studio

Painting = Silent Weapon – Winsor & Newton – Vintage Advertising Campaingns – ART AS SUBSTITUTE OF GOD !!!!!


   

Painting = Silent Weapon – Winsor & Newton – Vintage Advertising Campaingns – ART AS SUBSTITUTE OF GOD !!!!!

http://www.winsornewton.com/news/new-products/vintage-advertising-campaigns?lang=gb&utm_campaign=1107369105&utm_content=1032235084235&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Emailvision

I found this article about vintage Winsor&Newton’s Campaign.
It is so appropriated, I really liked. I have used Winsor & Newton paint since 1999 and since 2000 exclusively this brand as I really care about posterity of the works and quality when painting. It made me glad to find this poster.
It is from the Second War ….. what makes sense…..
But makes me ask for how many generations have we been taught to believe that art can be used as weapon……
Isn’t this too common sense ? And for how long, centuries or decades have we believed that art can make real difference? Wasn’t like that at the beginning of the civilization and Art History.
Who has/had the interest to teach this and keep it alive? Why?
And why people believe that it is true? I learned this when was at the Kinder Garden already? Was I victim of brain wash? With what interest it was done to me? When it started?
And if it is all wrong? Why did the society started to substitute the idea that God, Moral and spirituality wasn’t the solution for Freedom or the Truth anymore but art and the men’s invention was ?
People that puts its faith on art isn’t different that people that puts its faith on science or money.

For how many years will I fight to clean the masonry and illuminati’s influence on the society for the last 4 centuries from my life, body, mind and soul ? I WANT TO GET RID OF THIS WORLD.

www.silentspots.blogspot.com
www.meinwelt-22.blogspot.com
www.caiowelt.blogspot.com

Caio Fern said…
paint this up… Linda !!!!

March 23, 2011 9:50 AM
Anne Huskey-Lockard said…
Hey Caio,

I’ve always felt people who are afraid of art are people who have a lie to tell and think an artist might portray the truth.
I am not saying art hasn’t been used as propaganda, but currently we are facing massive cut to the National Endowments for the Arts and Public Broadcasting, and certain political wanna-bes and pundits are *demonizing* the arts as a whole, and anything art related.
Well, maybe it’s because we don’t bow to their political, divisive whims. Maybe we have a little more intelligence~~maybe want an opposing viewpoint to be able to conscientiously consider before forming an opinion.
I have no answers other than the times I am living in are unkind to artists wanting to portray the truth of what is going on. Never thought I would see the day either…

XXOO~~♥
Anne

March 23, 2011 10:05 AM
Caio Fern said…
Hello Anne !!!
i was only asking why we were taught to worthship art in general.

i think it is a little bit deeper than politics.
It is about spirituality.

March 23, 2011 10:12 AM
Caio Fern said…
other thing…. is another , totaly diferent subject to me … but here in Brazil government uses art for alienating the poor population.

March 23, 2011 10:14 AM
Anne Huskey-Lockard said…
Hmmm….that is sad and interesting that they do that with art. The business of art being only for the wealthy.
I don’t know why it is not an accessible item to everyone. There have been too many strings attached to the whole thing.
People need to just make art. And I agree–I think there is a particular spirituality to it, at least when I work. (an aside, my minister is having me speak to a confirmation class about Spirituality in Work….ought to be interesting…)
I wish there were no politics involved in it at all.
That’s a dream! 😉

XXOO~~♥
Anne

March 23, 2011 10:20 AM
Caio Fern said…
that is a dream…
but for the last thousands of years art and politic = power… were always closed related. 99,9% of the masterpieces wouldn’t exist if the royal familys and richer familys weren’t behind suporting it production.

So we must to learn to deal with it and be ble to put our particular view of world, human being and feeling despite all the money and power involved.

even so all this only started, again, not for political issues… i was only asking why and how all the modern civilization substituted it real spiritual values for aesthetical values .

March 23, 2011 10:26 AM
Caio Fern said…
The aim of every artist is to arrest motion, which is life, by artificial means and hold it fixed so that a hundred years later, when a stranger looks at it, it moves again since it is life.”
William Faulkner

March 23, 2011 11:24 AM
Caio Fern said…
This post has been removed by the author.
March 23, 2011 11:52 AM
Caio Fern said…
Christine Tarantino – NewNew Art –
This morning I was thinking about similar things. How as soon as I make a mark, that mark is dead. It no longer flows, it stops. I wonder if this is something artists might think about, ethically. Do you want the marks you make to really be there? And should all marks of art be beautiful? I say yes, to try is to aspire.

Caio Fern – Christine…if i don’t leave my work to posterity i feel no will to work….. my only need to to reach peoples the way artists of other centuries reached me.
it is more than reaching people from other cultures… i want to reach people from other times too…… this is eternity in art … this is a way of human being reachs some “material” ” phisical” and emotional eternity. about spiritual issues…..i don’t need art at all.
spiritual developing can be reached by itself .

but my work talks only about spirituall issues 😀

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past , praying, future by Caio Fern 2011


acrylic on canvas by Caio Fern 2011 – Down with the Myth.


acrylic on canvas by Caio Fern 2011 – Down with the Myth.

this is rare…I’ve been with this painting in mind for more than one week… as a matter of fact, before to start and finish the last one I already had this above all planed.
Sure that never gets as imagined…. as I have experience with this I never imagine too much, never get into details.
But what is rare is that when I paint I only get into the studio feeling like to paint but I never know what is going to happen there , i never make plans or develop an idea… things just happen…. but this one have born a time ago and I let it land as dust, before to work with.
What does it mean to me? Nothing, is a painting and never expected to be more than this. I painted listening sitcoms, so i was laughing. Pretty magic hein? wow, what inspired artist, hahahah! This is good…. to kill all these myths about an artist in the studio. Trust me , I wasn’t only snacking because I can’t hold food and paint at the same time and because I am a freak about cleansing near my works and material art supplies.
Even so I liked the final result and I think it pretty much express what I have lived these last weeks.
Hope you have enjoyed too.

www.silentspots.blogspot.com
www.meinwelt-22.blogspot.com
www.caiowelt.blogspot.com

The Museu de Arte de São Paulo (MASP) ~ The Finest Art Collection In South America


http://www.artknowledgenews.com/2011_03_14_23_27_15_the_museu_de_arte_de_sao_paulo_masp_the_finest_art_collection_in_south_america.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+artknowledge+%28Art+Knowledge+News+-+Keeping+You+in+Touch+with+the+World+of+Art…%29

 

The Museu de Arte de São Paulo (MASP) ~ The Finest Art Collection In South America

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artwork: The Museu de Arte de São Paulo (MASP). Widely considered to be the finest art museum in the Southern Hemisphere. MASP has occupied the iconic concrete and glass structure designed by Italian architect Lina Bo Bardi since 1969.

The São Paulo Museum of Art (MASP) is located on Paulista Avenue in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. It’s well-known for its current home in a 1968 concrete and glass structure designed by Lina Bo Bardi, the main body of the building is supported by two lateral beams over a 74 meter freestanding space. The building is considered a landmark and a symbol of modern Brazilian architecture. MASP is internationally recognized for its collection of Western art, considered the finest in Latin America and indeed, the entire Southern Hemisphere. It also houses an impressive collection of Brazilian art, prints and drawings, as well as smaller collections of African and Asian art, antiquities, decorative arts, and others, amounting to almost 15,000 pieces. MASP also has one of the largest art libraries of the country. The museum’s history started in the 1940s. Assis Chateaubriand, founder and owner of Diários Associados (“Associated Dailies”), the largest media and press conglomerate of Brazil at the time, launched a campaign, with the bold intent of acquiring masterpieces to form an art collection of international standard in Brazil. Originally, he intended to locate the museum in Rio de Janeiro, but chose São Paulo where he believed it would be easier to gather the necessary funds, since the city was booming. At the same time, the European art market had been deeply influenced by World War II, making it possible to acquire fine artworks for reasonable prices. Chateaubriand recruited Pietro Maria Bardi, an Italian professor, critic and art dealer, to help him create a “Museum of Classical and Modern Art”. The museum was inaugurated and opened to the public on October 2, 1947, displaying the first acquisitions, including canvases by Picasso and Rembrandt on the first floor of the Associated Dailies headquarters. In the 1950s the museum expanded, creating the Institute of Contemporary Art (offering workshops of engraving, drawing, painting, sculpture, dance and industrial design), the Publicity School (presently the ‘Superior School of Propaganda and Marketing’), organizing debates about cinema and literature and creating a youth orchestra and a ballet company. Alongside the educational program, the museum expanded its collections and began to organize travelling exhibitions from the collection. Between 1953 and 1957, a selection of 100 masterpieces of the museum’s collection traveled throughout European museums, such as Musée de l’Orangerie (Paris) and the Tate Gallery (London). In 1957, the collection was displayed in the United States, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and in the Toledo Museum of Art. The following year, the museum’s holdings were presented in other Brazilian institutions, such as the Museu Nacional de Belas Artes, in Rio de Janeiro. These exhibitions served to gain publicity for the fledgling museum, increasing attendance and providing funds for further expansion of the collection. It soon became clear that the museum needed its own, much larger site, and in the 1950s plans were drawn up to move into a purpose-built gallery on a site donated by the city council and Italian-born architect Lina Bo Bardi (wife of Pietro Maria Bardi) was commissioned to design the new building. The construction is considered to be unique worldwide for its peculiarity: the main body of the building stands on four lateral supporting pillars, creating a void underneath the building. Built between 1956 and 1968, the new museum was inaugurated by Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom. The museum building has 13,000 sq. meters of floor space spread on five levels, including the permanent and temporary exhibition rooms, library, photo gallery, film gallery, video gallery, two auditoriums, restaurant, a store, workshop rooms, administrative offices and restoration facilities. More than 60,000 visitors a month make the MASP the most visited museum in São Paulo. Visit MASP’s website at …
The São Paulo Museum of Art (MASP) is located on Paulista Avenue in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. It’s well-known for its current home in a 1968 concrete and glass structure designed by Lina Bo Bardi, the main body of the building is supported by two lateral beams over a 74 meter freestanding space. The building is considered a landmark and a symbol of modern Brazilian architecture. MASP is internationally recognized for its collection of Western art, considered the finest in Latin America and indeed, the entire Southern Hemisphere. It also houses an impressive collection of Brazilian art, prints and drawings, as well as smaller collections of African and Asian art, antiquities, decorative arts, and others, amounting to almost 15,000 pieces. MASP also has one of the largest art libraries of the country. The museum’s history started in the 1940s. Assis Chateaubriand, founder and owner of Diários Associados (“Associated Dailies”), the largest media and press conglomerate of Brazil at the time, launched a campaign, with the bold intent of acquiring masterpieces to form an art collection of international standard in Brazil. Originally, he intended to locate the museum in Rio de Janeiro, but chose São Paulo where he believed it would be easier to gather the necessary funds, since the city was booming. At the same time, the European art market had been deeply influenced by World War II, making it possible to acquire fine artworks for reasonable prices. Chateaubriand recruited Pietro Maria Bardi, an Italian professor, critic and art dealer, to help him create a “Museum of Classical and Modern Art”. The museum was inaugurated and opened to the public on October 2, 1947, displaying the first acquisitions, including canvases by Picasso and Rembrandt on the first floor of the Associated Dailies headquarters. In the 1950s the museum expanded, creating the Institute of Contemporary Art (offering workshops of engraving, drawing, painting, sculpture, dance and industrial design), the Publicity School (presently the ‘Superior School of Propaganda and Marketing’), organizing debates about cinema and literature and creating a youth orchestra and a ballet company. Alongside the educational program, the museum expanded its collections and began to organize travelling exhibitions from the collection. Between 1953 and 1957, a selection of 100 masterpieces of the museum’s collection traveled throughout European museums, such as Musée de l’Orangerie (Paris) and the Tate Gallery (London). In 1957, the collection was displayed in the United States, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and in the Toledo Museum of Art. The following year, the museum’s holdings were presented in other Brazilian institutions, such as the Museu Nacional de Belas Artes, in Rio de Janeiro. These exhibitions served to gain publicity for the fledgling museum, increasing attendance and providing funds for further expansion of the collection. It soon became clear that the museum needed its own, much larger site, and in the 1950s plans were drawn up to move into a purpose-built gallery on a site donated by the city council and Italian-born architect Lina Bo Bardi (wife of Pietro Maria Bardi) was commissioned to design the new building. The construction is considered to be unique worldwide for its peculiarity: the main body of the building stands on four lateral supporting pillars, creating a void underneath the building. Built between 1956 and 1968, the new museum was inaugurated by Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom. The museum building has 13,000 sq. meters of floor space spread on five levels, including the permanent and temporary exhibition rooms, library, photo gallery, film gallery, video gallery, two auditoriums, restaurant, a store, workshop rooms, administrative offices and restoration facilities. More than 60,000 visitors a month make the MASP the most visited museum in São Paulo. Visit MASP’s website at … http://masp.art.br

The collection contains almost 10,000 pieces, mostly of Western art from the fourth century BC to today. The collections of French and Italian artworks are particularly strong. Italian artists are represented by Raphael, Botticelli, Mantegna, Giovanni Bellini, Titian, Tintoretto, Perugino, Piero di Cosimo, Guido Reni and Guercino. Notable French works include paintings by François Clouet, Poussin, Jean-Marc Nattier, Delacroix, Courbet, Manet, Monet, Renoir, Degas, Cézanne, Van Gogh and Toulouse-Lautrec. MASP also has the complete collection of 73 sculptures by Edgar Degas as well as three of the artist’s paintings. Spanish Art is represented by El Greco, Francisco Goya and Diego Velazquez with British Artists include works from Thomas Gainsborough, Joshua Reynolds, John Constable, George Romney and J. M. W. Turner, among others (including a Winston Churchill oil painting “The Blue Room, Trent Park”). Among the works by Flemish, Dutch and German artists which are on show are paintings by Hieronymus Bosch, Memling, Cranach, Quentin Matsys, Peter Paul Rubens, Rembrandt, Frans Hals, Anthony van Dyck and Jan van Dornicke. American artworks in the collection include pieces by Torres Garcia, Diego Rivera, Siqueiros, Alexander Calder and among many Brazilian artists, including Frans Post, Victor Meirelles de Lima, Nicolas Antoine Taunay, Tarsila do Amaral, Nicola Antonio Facchinetti, Candido Portinari, Di Cavalcanti, Anita Malfatti, Lasar Segall, Almeida Junior, Victor Brecheret and Flavio de Carvalho. Modern and contemporary works include paintings and drawings by Pablo Picasso, Fernand Leger, Modigliani, Matisse, Marc Chagall, Max Ernst, Salvador Dalí, Joan Miró, Andy Warhol and Jim Dine. MASP also have small but significant collections of African and Asian arts. The core collection also includes archaeological artifacts (Egyptian, Etruscan, Greek, Roman and pre-Colombian American), sculptures (including Rodin bronzes, pieces by Ernesto di Fiori and Victor Brecheret among others), drawings, prints, photographs, majolica (Italian pottery), as well as tapestries, clothing and design.

MASP have a large program of temporary exhibitions, featuring both works from their own collection and loan items. Amongst the former, a special exhibition of sculpture from the collection under the title “Fashionable Obsessions: Sculpture from the MASP Collection” (until March 27th 2011) features 50 works by masters of three-dimensional art from the 19th century to the present day (and a pair of Tang-dynasty Chinese terracotta warriors). Among works by Renoir, Degas, Brecheret, Felicia Leirner, Alexander Calder, Bruno Giorgi, Rodin, Arcangelo Ianelli, Duke Lee, Jim Dine and others, particular highlights include “Greta Garbo” by Ernesto de Fiori, “Venus” by Pierre Renoir, “14 year old dancer” by Edgar Degas, “Birds” by Wesley Duke Lee and “Winged Bicho” by Emanuel Araújo. Until May 1st 2011, “Brzilian Papers: The Art of Printmaking” features a selection of over 120 works by masters of the different techniques of engraving. “The Art of Printmaking” collects works by Volpi, Tarsila, Babinski, Samico, Manny Araujo, Gruber, Garden, Segall, Grassmann, Valentine, Hudinilson, Leirner and many others from the MASP collection. These works illustrate the history of printmaking in Brazil. An ongoing exhibitions “Gods and Madonas – The Art of the Sacred” features 40 works from the 14th to 19th centuries, including Andrea Mantegna’s “St. Jerome in the Wilderness”, on display for the first time since undergoing restoraration. Besides the museum, MASP is a cultural center that provides various activities to the public as an art school, workshops, dance performances, music and theater, lectures and debates, courses for teachers, among many other activities held throughout the year.

Among the sculptures stand out the marbles of the Greek goddess Higéia the fourth century BC and the collection of 73 sculptures by Degas, which can only be seen fully in the MASP, the Metropolitan Museum in New York or the Museum D’Orsay in Paris . Collections of prints, photographs, drawings, archeology, majolica, tapestries and European decorative arts, plus a large collection of kitsch pieces, are also part of the museum. The museum has broadened its collection through donations from individuals and partnerships with companies and institutions. Since 1990, it is considered essential to the exchange and partnership between museums in the world, is to upgrade skills or to restore our works. Responsibilities of the Department of Conservation and Restoration. The Department of Conservation and Restoration of MASP conservation, preservation and restoration of works belonging to the museum, as well as assist in the conservation area for temporary exhibitions from other museums or institutions. Whereas the museum’s works are stored, displayed and transported in accordance with international museums, the department of conservation and restoration develops an important role in preventive conservation, treatment and safety of the collection. The mission of MASP is to “encourage, promote and sustain, by all means at its disposal, the arts in general and in particular the visual arts, promoting the development and cultural improvement

http://masp.art.br

acrylic on canvas by Caio Fern 2011


Acrylic on canvas by CAIO FERN 2011.


Acrylic on canvas by CAIO FERN 2011.

Light, textures volumes … all by colors. I love this . How to talk about Truth creating an illusion? painting.
Painting this morning made me remember a lot when I used to go to Tate Gallery by walking from down town only to see those tiny colorful brush strokes. I think so unfair when people talk about the pre-raphaelites. They say very good things and all true but they only talk about the beauty of the scenes , the narrative characteristic of it .
William Holman Hunt, John Everett Millais and Dante Gabriel Rossetti, William Michael Rossetti, James Collinson, Frederic George Stephens and Thomas Woolner ….
They were all very very good painters with brilliant and beautiful pictorial solutions fir every detail of every work . Nobody says this .
I could never see all that by book. I had sympathy by these painters but never considered then great ones, only very good illustrators. Going to Tate i was convinced to totally change my mind. Their way to deal with the brush captivated my heart. It was love at the first sight, and second sight and after millions of sights later. “How can I live without then in my life”… I used to say knowing that would have to leave London one day.
The painting today brings some lesson I learned with those works even I have used a much thicker paint.
This is one of the things I love about painting , you can bring other cultures from distant times to your everyday life in a very authentic and exclusive way. Will always have a conversation with the best that have survived from the civilization.
An artist doesn’t need to fear or deny the past for creating an unique work. Denying all that you will only participate of a blind dance for ignorant people. Who wants that ?
I am still working the Sao Paulo’s light of noon have painted by photo because don’t want to stand under the sun with a mirror in front of me and having to hurry up before the light changes. I woke up early in the morning and went to studio to paint very calm, fresh and happy.
I have prayed so much for God gives me a good work. I’ve done this for my entire life but lately I’ve done with more intensity. After to finish I only say Thank You Sir and get happy.

www.silentspots.blogspot.com
www.meinwelt-22.blogspot.com
www.caiowelt.blogspot.com

Acrylic on Canvas by Caio Fern 2011 – Eu Voo pro Ceu


acrylic on canvas by Caio Fern 2011
Eu Voo pro Ceu

www.silentspots.blogspot.com
www.meinwelt-22.blogspot.com
www.caiowelt.blogspot.com